Data centers consume less energy than thought according to new models

Very often when we talk about electricity consumption we mention the data centers, essential centers for the functioning of the Internet itself. According to a new study produced by researchers from various institutes, however, data centers can no longer be cited as one of the main causes of the growing consumption of electricity in the world because in recent years there have been very important improvements in the efficiency of these systems.

The models that researchers have calculated, in fact, reveal that, although the data centers themselves have increased in number in the world, in the last 10 years the power consumption would have remained almost unchanged.
This can be explained by the continuous improvements in the efficiency of the data centres themselves, both as regards the computers themselves and the cooling systems.

Of course, this does not mean that the information technology industry and policy makers can “rest on their laurels”, as Eric Masanet, one of the authors of the study, explains: “We believe that the remaining efficiency potential is sufficient to last several more years. But the growing demand for data means that everyone, including policy makers, data center operators, equipment manufacturers and data consumers, must step up their efforts to avoid a possible increase in power consumption at the end of this decade.

The study, published in Science , made use of various data from various sources, including data on market developments in the data centre and server sector.
The researchers concluded that the efficiency gains in recent years are much greater than those observed in other sectors of the global economy.

Janice Walker

Janice Walker is a biologist (having graduated from Prescott College in 2013) and an experienced writer. She currently works as a pharmacist, contributing research and content to Studio 24 News during her nights and weekends. During her time at Prescott College she was an active contributor to her student journal and hopes to grow studio24.me up as a well established, popular science blog.
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Janice Walker